Handmade Soap

Make Cold Process Soap Tutorial

This is an easy, mild olive oil soap, good for
beginners to learn the basic steps needed to make Cold
Processed Soap.

cold process soap picture

Recipe: (Makes 8 lbs.)

  • 24 oz. olive oil
  • 24 oz. coconut oil
  • 38 oz. vegetable shortening (Crisco)
  • 11.8 oz. lye
  • 30 oz. distilled water
  • 3 to 4 oz. any essential or fragrance oil

Equipment Needed:

  • Scale that weighs in pounds and ounces
  • Large one gal. stainless steel or enamel pot (use
    this exclusively for soapmaking)
  • Two plastic pitchers, 2 to 3 qt. size
  • Hand stick blender (optional, but makes tracing
    much easier)
  • Plastic measuring cup 2 to 3 cup size
  • Two wooden or plastic spoons (one for the lye and
    one for the oils. Use these
    exclusively for soapmaking)
  • Two kitchen thermometers (one for the lye and one
    for the oils must read to
    over 100 degrees)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Safety goggles
  • Clear plastic container with snapon lid 8″ x 11″
    x 3″ deep, or wooden soap mold
    lined with freezer paper
  • Large piece of cardboard the size of the wooden
    mold, used as a lid
  • Old blanket
  • Freezer paper or plastic garbage bags

Remember:

Be sure to allow for
the weight of the containers. Lye (Sodium Hydroxide NaOH) All ingredients
should be weighed.

Begin by putting on your goggles and rubber gloves and weigh out 2 ozs. of
lye into one of the plastic containers. Weigh out 32 oz of distilled water
into the other container. Slowly and in a steady stream pour the lye into
the water, stirring until dissolved. Do this in a well ventilated area and
try not to splash. Let the lye/water mixture sit until the temperature
reaches between 100-125 degrees (unless otherwise stated by the recipe you
are using). This may take several hours, but if you’re in a hurry you can
place the container in a cold water bath to bring down the temperature
quicker.

In the meantime, get your oils ready by weighing out 24 oz. of coconut oil
and 38 oz. of vegetable shortening and placing them into your pot. Heat them
up just until they melt and then remove from heat and add the 24 ozs. of
olive oil. Stir to incorporate and put one of the thermometers into the pot
to check the temperature. The oils will also have to be between 100-125
degrees (unless otherwise stated by the recipe you are using). Both the
lye/water mixture and the oils will have to be at the same temperature
before incorporating them.

Prepare your additives. Start with just 3-4 ozs. of essential oil or a
combination of essential oils (blend). *Note- (some essential oil scents are
stronger, so use less, some are lighter and you may add more depending on
your preference). Also, measure 1/4 cup of any dried herbs or flowers
(optional). Its best to start simple for your first batch. You can also add
1-3 tablespoons of pigment (optional) for coloring.

Grease the clear plastic container that you’re using as your mold and place
a piece of freezer paper on the bottom of the container for easy release OR
line the container with a plastic garbage bag. If you are using our wooden
soap mold, line it with freezer paper.

Check the temperature of the lye and oils. When they reach between 90-100 degrees,
its time to “make soap.” Slowly pour the lye/water mixture into the oils,
stirring continuously. You may continue to stir using a spoon or switch to
the stick blender. Stir or blend in all the lye and you will begin to see
the mixture thicken. Just as the mixture thickens to the point where you see
tracks or “trace” in the soap, add essential oils and any dried ingredients
or colorants. Remove about 2 cups of the mixture and add the colorant to the
2 cups. Then add that back into the pot. Continue to stir or blend until you
see designs on the top of the soap (this is known as tracing and can happen
in 10-40 minutes depending on the temperature of your mixture). Quickly add
the mixture to the mold. Cover with the lid. *Note* if the soap mixture does
not fill the mold to the top, place a piece of freezer paper on top of the
soap and then put the lid or a piece of cardboard on the container. This
will prevent soda ash. Wrap in blankets and place in an undisturbed area for
18 hrs. Remove the blankets and lid and leave the soap in the mold for
another 12 hrs.

You should have a nice hard block of fresh soap which you can now remove
from the mold. Let the block of soap sit for a day to firm up or slice into
bars or chunks immediately. Then place bars in an open box or drying rack
for 2 weeks or longer. Don’t allow the bars to touch one another. The soap
should be cured completely after 2 weeks, but the longer it cures, the
milder and harder it will be.

Ponte Vedra Soap Shoppe also offers
books packed with loads of
useful information for both the novice and experienced soapmonger.

This Tutorial was provided by
The Ponte Vedra Soap Shoppe.



Make Cold Process Soap Tutorial

Ingredients:

 

  • 1 c soap flakes
  • 10 c water
  • 1 Tbs glycerin

Equipment:

 

  • Cheese grater
  • A large pot
  • Measuring cup and spoons
  • A spatula for stirring
  • A soap container with a hand pump
  • A container to hold excess soap
  • Funnel

First, grate the soap. Get out your cheese grater and get grating. I found this to be surprisingly easy, but time consuming. When you are done, the soap flakes look like grated Parmesan.

grate the soap

One bar of soap yielded a little over 1.5 cups of flakes. The recipe only uses one cup of soap flakes, so I put the remaining soap in a jar for later use.

soap flakes

In a large pot, combine 1 cup soap flakes, 10 cups water. Turn on medium-low heat and stir until the soap dissolves. This happens fast, about a minute or two.

making liquid soap is so easyLet the soap cool completely, then and 1 Tbs glycerin. This will make your liquid soap extra moisturizing. When finished pour into the containers using the funnel. That is all there is to it!

soap coolingThis recipe makes a lot of soap, I put the excess in a large bottle and I’m storing it for later use.

your liquid soap is done!You can also use this soap as body wash. To make it smell nice, add a drop or two of color and essential oil to the mix. The kind of soap you use could make a difference in the end result. A higher quality soap will probably yield better liquid hand soap. I think for my next project I will make liquid soap out of cold process soap. Stay tuned for the tutorial.

Author: Magdoline Hammad



Make Cold Process Soap Embeds Tutorial

I found some really economically priced silicone ice cube
moulds in the shapes of small butterflies, only $2.00 per mould with 13
small butterflies to each mould. My fertile mind began to kick in and I
thought these would like nice in a bar of soap so I purchased a few of them
to make up this tutorial.

embeds1

I got to work and made up some un-fragranced cold process
(CP) soap. I used 5 colors which I thought would compliment each other
while set in a base of white CP. The butterflies are approximately 30mm X
20mm

Here you can see the different colors in the silicone
moulds waiting to set.

embeds2

The soaps popped out easily enough and I had planned on
using my soap planer to slice them into thin slivers but the soap was too
fresh and they were curling up so I used one of my small paring knives with
a thin blade to slice them up by hand. They then kept their flat shape even
if they were a little thicker than I had anticipated.

I let them dry out for week.

embeds3

All ingredients ready to go, along with the sliced up
butterflies.

embeds4

The soap is now at ‘trace’ ready for the addition of the
butterflies.

embeds5

I fragranced the CP soap and added the butterflies. I
realized I could have had had more butterflies in the amount of CP I made
up. Its amazing just how much of the re-batched butterflies you can fit into
a small amount of CP.

embeds6

The mix was poured into the mould box and using a gloved
hand :-) I poked the butterflies down to the bottom of the mould box so they
would be flat as I didn’t have enough of the butterflies cut to give a good
solid filling so to make sure I had at least one good solid covering of the
butterflies I pushed them to the base.

embeds7

You can see how bare the surface looks after unmolding.

embeds8

The base is a different story :-) Pushing them into the by
hand has paid off!
Now they are ready to push out of the cavities.

embeds9

The finished bars turned out just as I had visualized them
in my head.

embeds_10

Tutorial Provided by Terry

 

silicone soap molds

 



Make Cold Process Gemstone and Rock Soaps Tutorial

Yes, these are truly easy to make. Even my very first
attempts came out great yours will, too. Heres how!

gemstone and rock soaprocks5rocks4
gemstone and rock soap9

You will need:

gemstone and rock soap_15

  • Cold Processed Soap Base
  • Colorants micas, oxides or liquid colorants
  • Fragrance oils of your choice
  • Rubbing alcohol in a spray bottle
  • Melting vessels (microwaveable plastic or Pyrex pitchers)
  • Variety of molds margarine, cool whip, gladware/ziplock bowls
  • Toothpicks, silicone or rubber spatula, knives, peelers, scrapers etc.
  • At the end of this information packet, there is a list of websites that
    are suppliers of soap, colorants and fragrances.

gemstone and rock soap3

Colorants

I prefer to use micas in the gemstone soaps. They offer a
wide spectrum of hues and provide a variety of gem like effects including
pearlized, solid, metallic and glittering. I have over 30 micas that I use
for stones. Occasionally, I use oxides (lapis is ultramarine blue) but they
dont blend as well as the micas. Always use skin safe colorants.

Liquid colorants and dyes are used on a limited basis
because of the migrating or bleeding. There are times that you may want the
migrating colors. Take note of the black veining on the lapis picture. This
effect is created with liquid colorants. I make watermelon tourmaline by
making the layers dark green, clear and dark fuchsia. I know the colors will
migrate blurring the line of the layers. If you see real watermelon
tourmaline it has that gradient look so liquids work well for that stone. I
also use liquids if I want a clear stone like emerald or ruby. I use the
rock base, with pearlized matching mica and top off with the clear that is
colored with the liquid. The liquid color will migrate but it is not as
noticeable as the other layers are dark or similarly colored. Liquid
colorant is also used in the turquoise and jade soap as I use white base and
micas dont work as well with the white base. They need the transparency to
really sparkle and you cannot get a vibrant deep gem quality color with the
white base and micas.

Essential and Fragrance Oils

Any skin safe essential or fragrance oils can be used. Be
sure you follow the manufacturers directions for safe usage percentages.
You will want to be wary of any fragrances that will morph your colorants.
The most common offenders are fragrances with vanilla. A good fragrance
supplier will tell you in the product description if the color will cause
browning. There are vanilla color stabilizers on the market that work most
of the time.

gemstone and rock soap 4

Step 2 Creating the master block

gemstone and rock soap5

I suggest starting with a basic gemstone rather than the
more elaborate crystal museum type of stones.

You can use just about anything for a mold as long as it
is flexible enough to remove the finished soap. I have custom-made silicone
molds that I use, but I started with cool whip, margarine, zip lock/gladware
type containers. You will have a little more waste with these types of
containers as you will have to cut away the edges to get rid of the shape of
the bowl. With the smaller square zip/glad containers you will get 3 to 4
small stones.

You really cant go wrong with these so use you creative
side to make each stone unique. The following directions are just a
guideline. Feel free to experiment.

gemstone and rock soap_10

Cold
Processed Soap Rocks/Gemstones:

I really didn’t do the CP soaps as a demo at the Mid
Atlantic Lights & Lather Symposium. I only had an hour of speaking time. I
took the CP soaprocks just to show, but here are the basic instructions for
CP rocks:

What I do is a rebatch without adding any extra oils or
liquids. I make one of my usual CP soap recipes and separate the batch
leaving some uncolored, and do some in several shades of the rock. I use
ultramarines and oxides for colorants in my CP, I dissolve them in glycerin
to avoid speckles.

Once the multi colored soap is removed from the molds, I
grate it on a cheese grater to make shreds, fresh out of the mold so it is
still soft. Then, like making soap balls, I just hand form the soap using
the various shades and white soap kneading it to create the marble effect.
To make the one in the picture with the green and black cubes of soap
embedded in the rock, I just cut up pieces of soap into chunks and worked
them into the softer soap. The soap is very malleable so I form it like
making a snow ball; I added things like coffee grounds, raspberry seeds,
cornmeal, oatmeal etc to get the stone like look. I stop a few times and
flatten the ball of soap, dust on a layer of metallic mica, and fold it over
that made nice copper, silver, gold veins. I then let the soap cure as
usual. Before it gets too hard, for my recipe I wait about a week or two, I
simply cut and beveled the ball into the rock shape. If I have any crevices,
I dust metallic mica into the whole to make a fissure. If there are not
imperfections to dust with the mica, I just take the point of a peeler or
chopstick and make a crevice. (I take the carvings and spray them with a
little water and repeat the process to make more rocks with the leftovers)

I finish by spraying with alcohol to bring out the shine
and allow the soap to finish curing.

Note:

You can make individual rocks by using paper cups. This is a good procedure to use
when experimenting as you can do lots of different colors without using a
lot of soap. Use a pan filled with rice or beans to act as a support for the
cup while cooling the layers. Start with a small amount of your top layer in
the bottom of the cup. I usually use colored, clear for my top layer. You
can tilt the cup to create a slanted soap by supporting the cup in the rice
pan. Allow to cool until firm enough to support the next layer. The next
layer can be the same color family but pearlized or sparkling. Spritz with
alcohol and pour the next layer. It is best to use cooler soap so as not to
melt the first layer. You can tilt it in the same direction or reverse the
tilt for interest. When set up enough, spritz and fill the cup with rock
base also spritzed and cover with melted clear MP. Allow to cool. You will
tear the cup away to unmold when you are ready to carve.

Step 3: Carving

gemstone and rock soap9

Once your master block is completely cooled, you can
unmold it. Decide how many stones you can get from this block and make your
first cuts with a large knife. I usually cut on an angle to create more
visual interest.

The next step is to use a paring knife to carve away the
basic shape. You dont want to have any signs of the original container.
First, decide if you want a crystal like cut or something rougher. For the
rough cut just cut away the container shape at random angles. Carve away
until you are satisfied with the shape.

For the crystal cuts, I start by making angled cuts on the
edges to get beveled edges. Cut and bevel all the sides. You can be as
elaborate or simple as you like with the facets. Fine-tuning can be done
with a peeler.

The carved soap may be a little dull from handling, if so,
spritz it with alcohol to bring back the sheen.

If you have any tiny holes in the stone, highlight them by
brushing metallic mica into the crevice. You can create crevices with the
point of the knife, peeler or chopstick. Use a good paintbrush with a chisel
point to paint the crevice with mica. If the mica doesnt want to stick to
the soap, spray the brush with alcohol before dipping it into the mica. One
tip for getting a clean edge on your metallic mica fissure is to paint in
the color, then using the peeler or knife slice away a very thin layer of
soap. You will end up with a striking sharp edge with the gold/copper
sparkling inside.

Advanced techniques – Museum pieces

gemstone and rock soap_12

Crystal formation soaps that replicate museum quality
gemstones can be made using the same techniques as the basic soap rocks.
These are not really user friendly as soap goes but they are fun for the
Wow factor.

To make the aquamarine stone, I made sheets and sticks
of MP by pouring a layer about 1/8 inch. I colored it with mica and used an
eyedropper to drop in tiny amounts of darker colors to get the shading. I
unmolded it and cut it into strips then filled a cup with the sheets and
sticks. I then filled the cup with melted MP (slightly cooled so it didnt
melt the sticks) unmolded and carved out the shape I wanted. Then you just
place the finished crystal into a bed of quartz MP. The quartz is just
clear MP colored with snowflake or pearl mica, shredded in the food
processor and cut in to shards with a dough scraper. I used a small round
mold, poured in hot MP to act like glue to hold the pieces together while
letting the sharp soap shards to stick up out of the melted MP. After
cooling, remove and roughly carve so it does not have the bowl shape.

The amethyst and emerald and ruby formations are done the
same way. Carve the crystal elements separately and hold together with
shards and hot mp. The Tiger Eye & Malachite are done one layer at a time.
Malachite is dipped in layers. The veined lapis rock was made by using a
large fork to chop up the component chunks creating the craggy edges.
Another layer of dirty soap made with cornmeal, seeds, etc can be added to
the outside to add another dimension by melting MP with the additives and
dipping the piece into the slurry until the desired effect is reached.

The geode is a great way to use up all the scraps you will
have after the hand carving. The center is the same shreds used for the
quartz held together with melted MP, like making a snowball. I melt the
other scraps to get the colors for the layers. It is messy but I use my
hands to dip the center in the melted MP, smoothing and dipping over and
over again until you get the desired effect. Takes a while but uses up
everything so there is no waste.
I finish by dusting metallic mica on the outside and when cooled completely,
cut in half or quarters. I use a fork or chopstick to roughen up the quartz
center to give a more crystal like appearance.

I wrap my MP soaps immediately using a stretch food wrap.
I use Sams Club AEP wrap or the Sams Club premium stretch wrap from
Walmart. Stretch tightly and pull the wrap to the back of the stone then
trim off the excess. I package the wrapped soap in a crystal clear cello bag
for retail sale. For retail stores and craft shows and markets I display one
of each type of gem in a treasure chest lined with gold or velvet fabrics as
sniffer/samples.

Have fun and email me some photos of your finished gems!

gemstone and rock soap_14

 

round soap mold








Make Salt Soap Tutorial

The main part of your oils and butters should be coconut
oil. This will make sure your soap stays bubbly; even with a high salt
content. To compensate the drying effect of coconut oil, you’ll have to discount your
lye by about 15 to 20%.

For this batch I’ll use this recipe:

  • coconut oil 95% 475 grams
  • castor oil 5% 25 grams
  • water 190 grams
  • lye 72 grams
  • 60% of the weight of the oils in fine non-iodized table salt.

You could add up to 100% of the weight of your oils in
salt. Any salt but epsom salt is okay to use. All comes down to personal
preferences.

salt soap picture 1

Preparing colored sea salt

This is something that I really like; but it isnt
necessary.
A few days before I plan to make salt soap, I take out some coarse sea salt
and color it with blue food coloring. Just add a couple of drops to the sea
salt and mix real well.
Let is sit for a while to dry.

salt soap picture 2
Get prepared

  • I clean and sanitize my working space and get everything I need within reach.
  • Prepare your lye solution by measuring the lye and water. I use a very
    sturdy plastic pitcher for my water and slowly add the lye to it while
    stirring gently.
  • Let it cool down to room temperature.
  • Make sure you never use containers that easily overheat for mixing your lye
    solution (like glass jars) and stay away from aluminum.!
  • Measure out your oils/butter and soften them up in the microwave, on a low
    or medium temp.
  • I directly add my EOs to the oils. Here I use a combo of amber, ylang ylang
    and bergamot.
  • Line your mold and prepare your color(s).

salt soap picture 3

Add your lye mixture to your oils and stick blend
Stop when you reach a light trace.

Add the salt

salt soap picture

Mix the salt through your soap batter with a stainless steel spoon.

salt soap picture 5

Ill be using 5 colors for this batch; blue, gray-blue, light blue, sea green and a
bit of white.
Divide your soap batter over different containers and add each color. Mix it
trough with a spoon until full incorporated.

salt soap picture 6

In the pot swirl
Now transfer all the colors back into one bowl and mix them gently. Dont
stir to much or everything will just get bland.

salt soap picture 7

salt soap picture 8

salt soap picture 9

Into the mold.
I grab the mold and slam it on my counter a couple of times to avoid air
bubbles.

salt soap picture _10

The finishing touches: to keep a ‘nautical theme.
I sculpt the top with a spoon until it resembles a little wave. Remember
that colored sea salt? Nows the time to add it. Add a lot; not everything
will stick to the top and a lot will fall of while cutting later on.

salt soap picture _11

salt soap picture _12

Covering
up and my least favorite bit about soap making…
Cover up your log with saran wrap to prevent ash.

salt soap picture _13

Unmold:

Get your log out of the mold as soon as it has set up and
cut it.
This time I fell asleep with my doggy curled up next to me on the sofa and
totally forgot I had to cut my salt soap. It was incredibly hard to cut the
next day!

salt soap picture _14

Clean your soap up, rub it with a damp cloth and trim the edges if you want
to.

salt soap picture _15

Author: Dagmar

 

turtle soap mold

Make Rebatch Soap Tutorial

rebatched soap

Basic Materials:

  • Shredded Soap Base
  • Crock pot, small or medium size
  • Glass measuring cup
  • Wooden spoon
  • Whole milk or 2%
  • Powdered milk (secret ingredient)
  • Any additives, such as herb, flowers, grains, cornmeal, oatmeal, etc.
  • Colorant chips or liquid dye (optional)
  • Any fragrance oil or essential oil *(fragrance oils work great in
    rebatching)
  • Optional: additional oils such as sweet almond, jojoba, vitamin E
  • Mold/s (lightly greased with Vaseline)
  • Drying rack
  • You may half, quarter or double this recipe as needed.

Rebatching is a good way to get the feel for soap-making without having
to handle any caustic ingredients. You can also use a double boiler, but we
recommend the crock pot method. Takes about 2 hrs. to make.

Start by measuring out 4-6 cups of shredded base soap or as much as will fit
into your crock pot without going past the half-way mark. Measure out about
1 cup of milk (you’ll add this as needed, you may not use it all or you may
need to add a bit more). Add 1/2 cup of milk to the crock pot and the shredded
soap, put the lid on the pot and set it on the lowest temperature setting.
Check the mixture every 15 min. or so and gently stir with your wooden
spoon, but try not to make bubbles. If it looks very dry, add a little more
milk, and so on, until all the shredded soap is melted.

After an hour or so, it should have the consistency of soft mashed potatoes.
It also may look lumpy. Add about 1/2 cup of powdered milk. The powdered milk
will make the mixture very smooth and easy to pour. Go ahead and add any
additional ingredients, such as, Vit. E or grapefruit seed extract (which
act as a preservative). You can also add additional oils ( 1/2 -1 tsp.) such
as, castor (for shampoo like lather), almond oil or jojoba oil, etc. at this
time.

When you’re ready to add your colorant, herbs, and fragrance, remove the
amount of soap needed for your size mold from the crock pot and place it
into the measuring cup. Mix in your final ingredients, amounts of color,
herbs, fragrance will vary depending on your liking, and pour into molds.

The soap should be easy to pour, but not too runny. Leave your soap in their
molds overnight or until dry and remove the next dry. If you’re having
difficulty removing from the mold, place mold into the freezer for a few
minutes for easier release.

Cure them for 1 week on a drying rack. Wrap individual soaps to preserve
their scent.

Tip: As long as your crock
pot is set at the lowest temperature, your can leave your soap simmering
until your ready to mix and mold. Just check it to be sure it doesn’t get
too dry.

baby shower soap molds

The nature of the Handmade Soap analysis-1

Conditions of good soap

What kind of soap is a good soap?

(1) to completely remove the dirt (clean power)

(2) excellent foaming ability (foaming power)

(3) an appropriate degree of hardness (hardness)

(4) is not easy to soften (not softening)

(5) won in the use of custody does not perishable (stability)

(6) will not be over-stimulating to the skin (appropriate muscle)

Basically, as long as they meet the above conditions are to be regarded as a good soap.

(1) – (6) because of personal skin appropriate and inappropriate circumstances.

Prior investigation of the nature of good soap to use, then, of course, would be better.

Dry skin and sensitive skin, it is best to choose clean power weaker, but less likely to stimulate the skin soap.

Oily skin, you need to choose to thoroughly clean the skin fat and dirt, soap.

That being said, Handmade books are mentioned is nothing more than soap with moisturizing olive oil for the spindle, If you add the coconut oil will increase the soap bubble, but it will make dry skin … and so on instructions, but still people do not know how to make soap recipe for your own skin.

Although you can choose from a number of public soap formula began to try to confirm, but to make a handmade soap usually takes a month or more, such a test does not take much time to find the right skin soap. Writing, the case made out of soap trial, I felt not suitable when processing the rest of the soap is also a problem.

silicone soap molds

How To Make Cold Process Soap Tutorial

This is an easy, mild olive oil soap, good for
beginners to learn the basic steps needed to make Cold
Processed Soap.

cold process soap picture

Recipe: (Makes 8 lbs.)

  • 24 oz. olive oil
  • 24 oz. coconut oil
  • 38 oz. vegetable shortening (Crisco)
  • 11.8 oz. lye
  • 30 oz. distilled water
  • 3 to 4 oz. any essential or fragrance oil

Equipment Needed:

  • Scale that weighs in pounds and ounces
  • Large one gal. stainless steel or enamel pot (use
    this exclusively for soapmaking)
  • Two plastic pitchers, 2 to 3 qt. size
  • Hand stick blender (optional, but makes tracing
    much easier)
  • Plastic measuring cup 2 to 3 cup size
  • Two wooden or plastic spoons (one for the lye and
    one for the oils. Use these
    exclusively for soapmaking)
  • Two kitchen thermometers (one for the lye and one
    for the oils must read to
    over 100 degrees)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Safety goggles
  • Clear plastic container with snapon lid 8″ x 11″
    x 3″ deep, or wooden soap mold
    lined with freezer paper
  • Large piece of cardboard the size of the wooden
    mold, used as a lid
  • Old blanket
  • Freezer paper or plastic garbage bags

Remember:

Be sure to allow for
the weight of the containers. Lye (Sodium Hydroxide NaOH) All ingredients
should be weighed.

Begin by putting on your goggles and rubber gloves and weigh out 2 ozs. of
lye into one of the plastic containers. Weigh out 32 oz of distilled water
into the other container. Slowly and in a steady stream pour the lye into
the water, stirring until dissolved. Do this in a well ventilated area and
try not to splash. Let the lye/water mixture sit until the temperature
reaches between 100-125 degrees (unless otherwise stated by the recipe you
are using). This may take several hours, but if you’re in a hurry you can
place the container in a cold water bath to bring down the temperature
quicker.

In the meantime, get your oils ready by weighing out 24 oz. of coconut oil
and 38 oz. of vegetable shortening and placing them into your pot. Heat them
up just until they melt and then remove from heat and add the 24 ozs. of
olive oil. Stir to incorporate and put one of the thermometers into the pot
to check the temperature. The oils will also have to be between 100-125
degrees (unless otherwise stated by the recipe you are using). Both the
lye/water mixture and the oils will have to be at the same temperature
before incorporating them.

Prepare your additives. Start with just 3-4 ozs. of essential oil or a
combination of essential oils (blend). *Note- (some essential oil scents are
stronger, so use less, some are lighter and you may add more depending on
your preference). Also, measure 1/4 cup of any dried herbs or flowers
(optional). Its best to start simple for your first batch. You can also add
1-3 tablespoons of pigment (optional) for coloring.

Grease the clear plastic container that you’re using as your mold and place
a piece of freezer paper on the bottom of the container for easy release OR
line the container with a plastic garbage bag. If you are using our wooden
soap mold, line it with freezer paper.

Check the temperature of the lye and oils. When they reach between 90-100 degrees,
its time to “make soap.” Slowly pour the lye/water mixture into the oils,
stirring continuously. You may continue to stir using a spoon or switch to
the stick blender. Stir or blend in all the lye and you will begin to see
the mixture thicken. Just as the mixture thickens to the point where you see
tracks or “trace” in the soap, add essential oils and any dried ingredients
or colorants. Remove about 2 cups of the mixture and add the colorant to the
2 cups. Then add that back into the pot. Continue to stir or blend until you
see designs on the top of the soap (this is known as tracing and can happen
in 10-40 minutes depending on the temperature of your mixture). Quickly add
the mixture to the mold. Cover with the lid. *Note* if the soap mixture does
not fill the mold to the top, place a piece of freezer paper on top of the
soap and then put the lid or a piece of cardboard on the container. This
will prevent soda ash. Wrap in blankets and place in an undisturbed area for
18 hrs. Remove the blankets and lid and leave the soap in the mold for
another 12 hrs.

You should have a nice hard block of fresh soap which you can now remove
from the mold. Let the block of soap sit for a day to firm up or slice into
bars or chunks immediately. Then place bars in an open box or drying rack
for 2 weeks or longer. Don’t allow the bars to touch one another. The soap
should be cured completely after 2 weeks, but the longer it cures, the
milder and harder it will be.

 

bar soap molds

How To Make Retro Rose Soap

Retro Roses Decorative Soap


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Inspiration

Make your favorite soap base. One that is super slow to set and allows for time to decorate your soap.
Mix it until just emulsified.


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Pour about 1/4 cup into your mixing cups with mica.
Don’t scent this part of your soap or it will get thick.
I used TKB Apple Green POP and Chameleon Red Mica from Supplies by Star.


Retro Roses Decorative Soap


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Add your color and scent to your base and pour into your mold.
I left this one unscented (oops! forgot my fragrance!) and added some Blue POP mica from TKB.
I was going for a baby blue like in my inspiration photo…but since I used a high amount of olive oil it turned
a pretty pastel green instead. It will work!


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Pour your colors into your squirt bottles.


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

The first step is to tightly swirl the red roses.
You want to leave a little of the base poking through.
It’s okay if it’s a bit messy looking. We’ll beautify here in a minute.


Retro Roses Decorative Soap


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Then take a skewer and swirl the rose a bit.
Start from the outside and move inward. The bit of base color that
you left peeking through helps define your petals a bit.


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Here they are swirled and now we make the leaves.
To do the leaves simply place a dot of green wherever you want a leaf.
I did about two per rose.


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Then you’ll stick a skewer into the middle of the leaf dot and pull away
from the rose. This creates the whispy point of the leaf.

And that’s it! You’ve got a pretty Retro Rose garden!


Retro Roses Decorative Soap

Happy soaping!

Author:Amanda

 

bar soap mold